An analysis of traveling through the dark by william safford

He felt as if the cry in the wilderness was being heard. The last two lines of the poem try to solve the problem of environmental damage. The first four stanzas feature four lines each, while the final stanza offers only two lines.

Traveling Through the Dark: William Stafford - Summary and Critical Analysis

More Analysis of Traveling Through The Dark Stanza Three Then comes the revelation - the deer is pregnant - the fawn is inside and probably still alive. William Stafford Source William Stafford and Traveling Through The Dark Traveling Through The Dark is a deceptively simple poem which records the actions of a driver who finds a deer, killed on the road by a previous car.

Stafford taught for one academic year — in the English department at Manchester College in Indiana, a college affiliated with the Church of the Brethren where he had received training during his time in Civilian Public Service.

Traveling through the Dark

James Dickey called Stafford one of those poets "who pour out rivers of ink, all on good poems. Analysis of Traveling Through The dark Traveling Through The Dark is an 18 line poem, 5 stanzas, 4 of which are quatrains with a couplet at the end.

This is all happening in the dark, symbolic of a spiritual darkness? He was filled with pity and was unwilling to do anything. What will happen next? While dragging her body to the edge of the canyon, the speaker discovers to his shock and dismay that the poor doe was pregnant.

I keep following this sort of hidden river of my life, you know, whatever the topic or impulse which comes, I follow it along trustingly.

Traveling Through The Dark - Poem by William Stafford

The speaker thought hard about the dilemma, but then finally he knows that he must "push[ ] her over the edge" in order to save other lives on that treacherous road on that dark night. Inhe received a Ph. The fourth stanza is a break in the narrative. In his own quiet and conversational way the poet takes the reader into the dark of the night, to the scene of the accident, and explains the situation in quite a straightforward manner.

So the tone of the poem is ironical but the readers sympathize with fawn. Stafford said this in a interview: The large belly of the doe can mean only one thing. But the speaker is adamant that the fawn will never see the light of day - stanza one confirms this fact - yet there is hesitation as the fate of that fawn is held alone in the mind of the driver who cared enough to stop.

If occurs to him that his ordinary reaction to finding a dead deer in the road has now turned into a situation that renders him a callous man for throwing away the life an unborn baby. The speaker considers the possibility of delivering the fawn, which he would much prefer to do than just shoving it to it death.

William Stafford (poet)

The poem displays in five unriming stanzas. Stafford had a quiet daily ritual of writing and his writing focuses on the ordinary. Her belly was large. There is no full rhyme, no rhyme scheme in fact and the meter metre in UK varies somewhat, with iambic pentameter popping up here and there, in lines 7, 10 and In the beginning, the poet is moved deeply by the fawn but at the end, we find he ends the life of the fawn by pushing its mother down into the river."Traveling Through the Dark" by: William Stafford/5(2).

Traveling through the Dark is a beautiful short piece by William Stafford depicting the conflict between the human mind and human heart that is the conflict between the mind, a sense of responsibility and the heart, the compassion and emotions of the poet.

Traveling Through the Dark Analysis

In William Stafford's "Traveling through the Dark," the speaker creates a dramatic retelling of an event that happened to him one dark night traveling down a. By William Stafford Traveling through the dark I found a deer dead on the edge of the Wilson River road.

It is usually best to roll them into the canyon: that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead.

Analysis of Poem

By glow of the tail-light I stumbled back of the car. William Stafford and Traveling Through The Dark Traveling Through The Dark is a deceptively simple poem which records the actions of a driver who finds a deer, killed on the road by a previous car. The deer turns out to be pregnant and this fact plays on the mind of the helper, who wants to keep the road safe yet cannot stop thinking about the.

At its heart, William Stafford's "Traveling through the Dark" is about that moment when nobody is looking. It is about that moment when we could turn our backs and walk away from our responsibilities without any immediate, personal repercussions (except maybe that pesky conscience thing).

Download
An analysis of traveling through the dark by william safford
Rated 3/5 based on 78 review